Saint Thomas Aquinas

Monday, May 9, 2011

The Real Martin Luther: Luther and Lutherdom

 "I know no doctor whom I hate so much, although I once loved him so ardently. Surely there's more learning in Aesop, than in all of Jerome" the wisdom of Martin Luther.

There is an excellent book to read if you are interested in the arch-heretic Martin Luther. It is available on Amazon for $29.99 and it is titled, 'Luther and Lutherdom.' The book is 465 pages on the life and refutation of Martin Luther. There are many today who try and paint a rosy picture of the wretched, poor, sick, demented and twisted man that was Luther. As a confirmed liar, sophist, and a man who would use any means necessary to discredit the Catholic Church, there is little to admire. He put forth great efforts to pull men and women away from the religious life because quite simply, he could not hack it. He refused the grace that was offered to him in the religious life, so he wanted others to join in his cowardice and failure to live up to promises they made to God as well. In fact, he even instructed those making vows to lie about committing their lives to chastity, telling them that the vows were only conditional. The author of the book also exposes his lies and the many times he contradicted himself in various accusations he made against the Catholic Church. Whenever one argument would not hold up, he simply changed it. Luther also made erroneous claims against the great Angelic Doctor Saint Thomas Aquinas. The author easily refutes Luther's accusations. What I find interesting is that much of what Luther rebelled against was related to his sexual immorality. His rebelliousness was built largely upon his sinful inclinations, which he over and over again tried to justify with his crippled theology. If you want to understand the real character of Martin Luther then this book is one that belongs in your library. If you are into the digital readers you can also get a digital copy for free here. Here are a few quotes from the book.

Concupiscence cannot possibly he subdued: that, as I shall show in the next section, was the starting-point for Luther's "turn about" from and after 1515. This tells and explains the whole story.    He gradually got into a condition in which there was no longer any idea whatever of fighting or resisting carnal temptations and desires, or of subduing the flesh. Consent at once followed at the heels of every rising lust." Luther gradually thought, spoke, and wrote under the stress and impulse of evil desire, from which there then sprang such written productions as one can bring him- self to disclose in the case of only the most degenerate, and then but seldom...

In this particular respect, Luther followed the same path- way that was trodden from time immemorial, and is still kept, by those monks or religious who finally violate the fidelity they had sworn to God and who wive. It is the pathway once described by St. Bernard :    first carelessness, and neglect of prayer, in consequence of which that coldness within ;grace diminishes, and with it, by reason of that coldness, cheerfulness of spirit; the power of judgment is drowsed; the exercises of the order which before seemed easy, become unbearable; voluptuousness lures and is pleasing; what is right is thrown by and proscribed; the fear of God is abandoned. "Finally a free hand is given to shamelessness, and that rash, that shameful, that most foul leap is taken full of ignominy and confusion, from on high into the abyss, from the pavement into the dung-heap, from the throne into the sewer, from heaven into the mud, from the cloister into the world, from paradise into hell." There was still a further nutrient of carnal lust in Luther and in by far the greater part of his younger adherents, and that was drunkenness, intemperance. To conquer this alone, there is need of effort, supported by prayer and God's help, no less than for victory over the inner tyrant...

Spite of all, the saving of Luther, as of any other, would still have been possible, had he had recourse to prayer. It was just at the Wartburg that he would have had time to enter into himself and to return to God. But what do we hear from his own lips there? On Sept. 9, 1521, he writes to Spalatin: "Poor man that I am, I grow cold in spirit. I am still snoring on, and am lazy in prayer. Let us watch and pray that we fall not into temptation." Watching and prayer still?  But what temptation does he mean, that is not to be fallen into? That of the flesh, against which, then more than ever, he would needs have had the power of God? Not in the least.  He meant the temptation to let up in the warfare against the Church and the Pope. Luther was quite expressly opposed to priests and religious, in carnal lust, in the "uri," begging God's grace to be freed.  Even in the risk of unfaithfulness to God, he now knew only one remedy against the lust of the flesh, and that was to take unto one's self a wife!"...

To what depth did Luther fall, that he placed the satisfying of carnal lust, which the religious for- ever renounced by solemn vow, on the same level with the heroism of the apostles and martyrs! To him and his following, the very violation of the vows and moving were their witness for Christ and that they were Christians; through them, they declared, they found God and Christ; God, to whom they had vowed perpetual continency, called them to their wiving'...

The apostles, martyrs, and all true Christians, on the contrary, shrank from no difficulty, when there was question of following Christ and of bearing witness to Him. In that event, they knew no impossibility. They knew that "with God no thing is impossible, "that what is impossible with men is possible with God," that they could do all things in Him that strengtheneth them." In respect to warfare against the flesh, Luther and the fallen priests and religious, upon whom Lutheranism is built up, resembled cowardly soldiers, who, shrinking from difficulty, throw their guns into the grain.  They suffered themselves to be vanquished, not by the new Adam, not by Christ, but by the old Adam, the flesh, and carnal lust, to which nevertheless, at the time of their profession, they had bidden farewell until death, when, in- stead of them, they chose Christ as their inheritance. Now they gave Christ up, although they constantly referred to Him with their lips, to cover their iniquity with Him. They looked back upon the flesh; indeed, they demeaned themselves worse than ever before.

3 comments:

scotju said...

Uh-oh, now you've done it! You're going to get James Swan all upset, and he's going to post a series of articles on your 'bad' scholarship! LOL!
E Michael Jones also took notice in his "Degenerate Moderns" that Luther's rebellion sprang from his problems with lust. And the Apostle Peter in his second epistle said that the false prophets and apostles were slaves to carnal lusts. It's no wonder why one priest said "all heresies begin below the belt'.

Gary said...

496 years ago today Martin Luther nailed a small nail into the door of his Catholic church in Wittenberg, Germany, posting his 95 Theses.

That nail was probably the most significant of all nails since the crucifixion
of our Lord. It turned Europe on its head, diminished forever the power of a dictatorial Roman pontiff, and sparked a movement that would lead to religious liberty for all in the Western world.

But most importantly, he re-discovered the truth of the Gospel: the just shall live by faith...they do not need to live by fear; terrifying fear of the flames and torments of Purgatory, the "Christian's hell", a horrific place to pay for sins for which Christ has already made "satisfaction" when he shed his blood on the cross!

Thank you, Martin Luther!

May God bless his Church Catholic!

http://www.lutherwasnotbornagain.com/2013/10/a-southern-baptist-seminarian-converts.html

Matthew Bellisario said...

Unfortunately Luther discovered his own "gospel" which he invented. It was a significant act, since he contributed to destroying the Body of Christ!