Saint Thomas Aquinas

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Corrupt the Youth, Corrupt the Mass

Over at the "Pray Tell" blog we have yet another example of how the Catholic faith is being undermined by bad catechists. Their third installment on teaching the liturgy now focuses on how the Mass is taught to the youth. One catechist says, "For example, we begin the year by introducing a model altar, “the table for the family of God”, and showing the children how to prepare it with the altar cloth, chalice, paten, crucifix and candles for the Eucharist. One boy repeated this exercise for a year. Then one day he completed his preparation and turned to the rest of the class and announced, “Dinnertime!” With this word he acknowledges that Eucharist is essentially a meal, his classmates are his Eucharistic family, and that all should be invited. (Is it not ironic that this four-year-old Catholic child announces his own invitation to the meal he and his peers cannot yet receive?) Each sign introduced has a limitless depth of meaning, rooted in nature, life, Biblical history and liturgy. We gently set the children on the path of searching for this meaning for themselves and their community." Notice how nothing here, or in any of the three catechist's explanations have anything to do with Jesus or His sacrifice. Its all about community and having dinner. This is where in my opinion some of the worst damage is being done to the Church. These catechists are getting these kids at a young age and they are distorting their views on the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. This is a battle that we cannot afford to lose. Let us make strides to get into these types of programs in the Church and teach the youth what the Mass is really about.

2 comments:

GADEL said...

I totally agree with you on this one. Pax in Christo.

Godwin

Cory Tucholski said...

At the risk of saying something that you might actually agree with: As liberal as my Catholic upbringing was, no teacher or priest associated with my elementary school classes would have tolerated any one of us trivializing something as central to Christian faith and practice as the Lord's Supper by calling out, "Dinnertime!" after the place setting.